Ian F. Hunt

Cinematographer and Filmmaker

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Photography – Studio Location Photography Final Submission

studio location photography

Applied Studio Location Photography – Short CourseAlfa Romeo

For the final submission I have to shortlist from the 100’s of photographs taken over the last 10 weeks just 25 photographs. Of which at least 1 or 2 should be from each of the assignments set either in class or as mid week home assignments.

Broncolor Studio LightingAssignments for the studio location photography course include ‘Still-life for Advertising’, ‘Studio and Creative Lighting Techniques’, ‘Editorial’ and ‘Fashion/Portrait Photography’. Photographs were taken in Studio using state of the art studio Broncolor lighting equipment and on location using either natural light or battery powered lighting. We had a choice of location for the Editorial location shoot and our choice was Swanage, which proved to be a good choice as we were extremely lucky with the weather – cold but dry and bright.Broncolor Studio Lighting Pack

The second location shoot took place at Upton Country Park, the weather unfortunately not so kind but luckily we were shooting indoors in the basement of Upton House a Grade II listed building. We used the natural light filtering through the dirty windows and portable studio/location lighting kit. The reflectors we brought along proved to be essential when using the natural lighting and also proved useful when using the lighting equipment – something similar is now on my wish list. They are cheap to buy and the results obtained when reflecting natural light onto a models face amazing, removing the shadows produced by the main light source.

My 25 Studio Location Photography Shortlist (24 shown)

 

 

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Photography – Twin Sails Bridge – Summer Photography Project

Photography

Twin Sails Bridge - Poole Dorset

Twin Sails Bridge – Poole Dorset

In association with the Poole Tourist Board a project to photograph the Twin Sails Bridge was set along with a competition, the prize to see your photograph used in promotional material by the Poole Tourist Board.

As I was unfamiliar with the Bridge my first task was to do some research on the bridge itself, which I began by searching for images of the bridge on the internet. I found literally thousands of images, the bridge, new in construction had attracted the intentions of many photographers both professional and amateur in the short few months that construction had been completed. I quickly realised this was not going to be one of those situations where a unique photograph would be possible.

I then went onto research the bridge itself and discovered the name of the bridge came from its design, when open the bridge clearly appeared to look like the sails and twin masts of a sailing boat. For that reason it was apparent that for the brief to be fulfilled any photograph I took must be when the bridge was open and must be taken from a location where the twin sails were clearly visible.

  • iPhone 4S Photos

    Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 1 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 10 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 11 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 12 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 13 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 14 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 15 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 15 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 17 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 4 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 5 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 6 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 7 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 8 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Photo 9

My first set of photographs were taken at 12.30pm one very hot and sunny day, I picked 12.30pm as this is one of the bridges scheduled opening times. I set the tripod up with my Canon EOS 60D fitted with the Canon 18mm to 55mm kit lens. Using Aperture Priority I shot off a sequence of images capturing the bridge in its various states as it opened, lifting the road surface up to allow the waiting boats to pass beneath. The using the camera hand-held and now fitted with a 50mm prime lens I fired off another sequence of images, capturing details of the structure, using the depth of field to attract the viewers eye.

I then relocated to RNLI’s headquarters building where they kindly let me shoot another sequence of photographs from an external walkway looking towards one side of the bridge. These photographs I considered to be less successful as even with the Canon EOS 60D fitted with my most powerful zoom lens 55mm to 250mm and this set to its maximum magnification I was too far away for capture the details of the bridge.

As this is a working bridge cars, cyclists and pedestrians were visible in many of the photographs I’d taken. For the purposes of this project I decided these would distract from the central subject of the bridge and so in post production I removed all of these from the photographs using Photoshop CS5. At the same time I removed some of the shoreline details for example Electricity Pylons, Street Lighting poles from the photographs I would put forward.

Just for fun I also dropped into one of the photographs an image of a full moon, added a gradient to simulate night leaving the structure of the bridge in full daylight or in this case simulating moonlight. Although I thought this was my best image I decided not to enter it as it too far from reality.

  • Canon EOS 60D photos

    Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 1 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 11 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 12 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 14 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 18 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 20 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 23 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 25 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 28 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 29 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 31 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 6 Twin Sails Bridge Poole - Canon 60D Photo 8

Having some time on my hands and being in the area I decided to visit the bridge on another occasion but carrying only my iPhone 4S this time. Sunday morning at 10.30am in time to capture the bridge again at one of its scheduled opening times. This time with permission I positioned myself on private land at one side of the bridge and using the iPhone 4S and the Camera+ App I photographed the bridge as it rose into the Twin Sails position.

I was lucky again on this occasion with excellent weather and the bonus of heavy cloud formations in the distance adding some interest to the sky which had been absent on the previous photographs.

Conclusions

Both sets of photographs have their merits but surprisingly I think the iPhone 4S photographs are my preferred choice. There’s little difference in quality in fact the wider angle of the iPhone 4S lens allowed me to capture much more of the bridge than my Canons EOS 60D could although fitted with it’s 18mm to 55mm kit lens set at its widest angle.

I also felt the cloud formations added much more interest to the sky rather than the unbroken blue sky for the Canons photographs. The filters and presets of the iPhones Camera+ App also allowed for excellent options for editing these photographs adding more interest to the final images.

Printing

The next stage was to select which photographs I would submit for printing and for the competition. This was my only mistake I left the printing to the day of the competition picking them up just minutes before submission and unfortunately I submitted them even though I was not happy with the final result. In my opinion the prints were too dark and lacked the fine details of the images I’d reviewed on screen.

Needless to say I was not surprised when they failed to win the overall prize but happy to hear they will be used in the marketing material by the Poole Tourist Board with the artist being identified by name in the description.

 

 

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Photography Short Course – Flash Photography 2

Flash Photography

  • Fish Tanks

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Flash Photography

This was our second introduction to using Flash Photography on the Photography Short Course and follows on directly from where we left off from the previous weeks Balloon bursting.Water Balloon

A large fish tank filled with water standing on a table in front of a dark cloth background. A stand alone flash unit with a wireless trigger was positioned above and to the right of the balloon with the camera mounted on a tripod also positioned directly facing the tank. We held something in the water where we hoped the object would enter the water to pre focus, which meant all we needed to do was click the trigger.

The idea this time was to trigger the shutter just as an object was dropped into the fish tank. There was also a large glass vase filled with water and using a side flash, with a black or white card background to photograph objects agaisnt but unfortunately time did not permit me the opportunity to try this setup.

The pictures above show the result of those I caught as they dropped into the fish tank however there are many more pictures of empty tanks (triggered before entry) and tanks with the items laying at the bottom of the tank (Flash triggered late). What I learned from this simple exercise is timing and of course typical settings for using Flash to capture moving objects – to freeze a moment in time.

We repeated this experiment using a smaller fish tank but this time using a hand held Flash connected using a hot shoe adapter, connecting to the flash using a cable.

I’ve limited the editing to cropping and adding a tint using Lightroom 4, which can be downloaded as a 30 day trial version from Adobes website.

Camera Settings – Canon EOS 60D

None of these settings are set in stone but these seemed to give the best results.

  • Camera set to Manual
  • White Balance set to Flash
  • Shutter Speed 1/125 to 1/250 (depending on which flash gun was used)
  • Aperture set between F8 to F11

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Photography Short Course – Using the Flash

Photography Short Course

  • Darts

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Click on the thumbnails to see a larger version

This was our first introduction to using Flash on the Photography Short Course.

Balloons filled with water were suspended against a dark cloth background. A stand alone flash unit with a wireless trigger was positioned above and to the right of the balloon with the camera mounted on a tripod also positioned slightly to the right.

By using a dart the idea was to trigger the shutter just as a thrown dart bursts the Balloon.Water Balloon burst with a dart

The pictures above show the result of those I caught as they burst however there are many more pictures of intact Balloons and darts yet to touch the Balloon. What I learned from this simple exercise is timing and of course typical settings for using Flash to capture moving objects – to freeze a moment in time.

I also found out how good the basic Flash fitted to the Canon is at doing something like this – some of those pictures are taken using the cameras flash and some using an external flash unit costing £100’s – can you tell which is which?

I’ve limited the editing to cropping only using Lightroom 4, which can be downloaded as a 30 day trial version from Adobes website.

Camera Settings – Canon EOS 60D

None of these settings are set in stone but these seemed to give the best results.

  • Camera set to Manual
  • White Balance set to Flash
  • Shutter Speed 1/200
  • Aperture set between F8 to F11
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